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Çin Kültürünü Batı Kültürüyle Karşılaştırmalı Anlatan Çizgiler

Çin Kültürünü Batı Kültürüyle Karşılaştırmalı Anlatan Çizgiler

Siyu, Instagram'da @tinyeyescomics adlı hesabından Çin kültürünü ve ülkedeki günlük yaşamı Batılı kültürlerle karşılaştıran karikatürler paylaşıyor.

Gezginlerin seyahat deneyimlerini; illüstrasyonlarıyla, nakışlarıyla, karikatür karakterlerle ve GIF’leriyle anlattığı birbirinden renkli seyahat günlüklerine rastlamak mümkün. Beijing’de doğup büyüyen Siyu da batılı ülkelerdeki seyahat deneyimleri üzerinden Çin’i karşılaştırmalı olarak anlattığı karikatürler çiziyor.

Çin’deki günlük yaşam hakkında eğlenceli çizgiler

Siyu son 10 yılını sürekli seyahat ederek, ders çalışarak ve ABD, Birleşik Krallık ve Fransa gibi yabancı ülkelerde çalışarak geçirmiş. Bu süreçte rastladığı herkesin Çin hakkında pek çok şeyi merak ettiğini gözlemlemiş. Ancak insanların Çin hakkındaki izlenimlerin çoğunlukla hava kirliliği, komünizm, Facebook yasağı gibi kavramlardan ibaret olduğunu fark etmiş. Bazı gözlemler gerçeği yansıtsa da çoğu insanın Çin’deki çağdaş ve çok katmanlı yaşama dair hiçbir fikri olmadığını belirtiyor sanatçı.

Siyu bir yıl önce, @tinyeyescomics adlı Instagram hesabından Çin’in günlük yaşamına dair çizimler paylaşmaya başlamış. Başka kültürleri öğrenmek kendisi için her zaman eğlenceli bir deneyim olduğundan ve karikatürleri paylaşmaktaki amacı da bu deneyimi Çin’i merak eden insanlara aktarmak olmuş. Çizimlerinin çoğunda Çin kültürünü batı kültürüyle karşılaştırıyor. Karşılaştırma aracılıyla, aynı durum karşısında ne kadar farklı davrandığımızı ve başka bir şey yerine belirli bir şekilde nasıl düşünme eğiliminde olduğumuzu anlaşılır bir dille aktarabiliyor. Parçası olduğumuz bir kültür bize normal gibi geliyor ancak aslında her kültür kendi içinde tuhaf. Sanatçıya göre bir kültürü ilginç kılan da bu tuhaflıkları.

Siyu, her hafta düzenli olarak kültürler arası karşılaştırma yapan çizgilerini yayınlıyor. Ayrıca kişisel deneyimleri ve kendi yaşamından kesitler de bu karşılaştırmaların konusu olabiliyor.

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There’s a Chinese saying “三思而后行”, which means to think twice before taking actions. In history, Chinese value highly reflection and past experience, but acting cautiously and staying wise didn’t save the people from the arrival of the early western explorers who sailed into the unknown and took chances at the risk of their lives. China was forced to take actions in its modern history, often times too fast in exchange for development. While too much reflection on the past slows down the process of change and innovation, too much action without thinking results in waste of resources and irreversible consequences. It’s time for thinkers and doers to meet and learn from each other in this increasingly connected world. It’s happening. #thinking #doing #thinktwice #justdoit #past #future #chinese #western #culture #history #eastmeetwest #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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Disclaimer: What you see here is fictional and it only exists in my head. Please refer to real maps for travel purposes. Growing up in Beijing, I’m used to streets that lay out as an orthogonal grid in line with the four directions . Actually, lots of Beijingers use North, South, East and West to describe directions. In Paris, streets are not paralleled and it feels more like a radial web of triangles. I get lost from time to time, but there’s some general reference from here and there. Last time I when to Venice, I wouldn’t be able to get anywhere without my google map (even Google map was confused in some areas). It was like tangled threads without a clue. What is your city like? #street #city #cityplanning #directions #beijing #paris #venice #travel #culture #maps #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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The first time I saw the steep wavy roads in San Francisco, I immediately thought of a theme park I used to visit. It looks so surreal and exciting compared to the flat road I’m used to in Beijing. That was the only time I was considering learning to drive because it looks fun (but it’s definitely much less fun when you have to walk or bike on this type of the road). Similar to Beijing, streets in SF are laid out on a grid pattern, except that the grid goes right over the many hills in town. The result is a unique collaboration between human and nature. ———————————————————— 🎁Bonus post: I discovered an interesting old French travel book about Beijing in the 1970s. Have a look inside on my new Patreon post (link bio) 👀 www.patreon.com/tinyeyescomics #city #topography #cityplanning #humanandnature #beijing #sanfrancisco #paris #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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I recently realized that I tend to change the portion size of different meals as I travel from one country to another. This is all personal habits, and I still don’t know which way is the best for my health. 🤷‍♀️ In France, breakfast is usually small and sweet. A croissant with a coffee will do. I know many people who skip breakfast. For lunch, grab a sandwich or a salad, it’s richer but still quite light. I eat the most at dinner, because dinner time is late in France and I often feel that I haven’t had enough from the previous meals. In China, there’s a belief that one should “eat well for breakfast, eat plenty for lunch, and eat light for dinner.” (早吃好,午吃饱,晚吃少)There’s a lot of choices for breakfast and it’s believed to be the most important meal of the day. Lunch is the time when I can eat as much as I wish, and my family like to have a light dinner, which is supposed to be good for digestion. In the U.S, when I cook for myself, I can still follow my normal routines as in China, but if I go out to eat or order stuff, I end up eating too much for every meal. I guess it’s mainly to do with the huge serving size, and I don’t like wasting food. And you? #eatinghabits #meals #portionsize #servingsize #breakfast #lunch #dinner #culture #sliceoflife #infographic #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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“Still or sparkling water?” In a French restaurant the waiter/waitress always asks this question before the meal. In the US, the default is usually still water with ice. I always wondered how people could survive with ice water in winter, since it’s already so cold outside. In China, people drink hot water a lot, which is strange for lots of non-Chinese. For one thing, tap water is undrinkable, for another, people have the habit of drinking hot water and believe that it’s good for health. (I was told that drinking ice water will cause stomachache problems.) #drinkingwater #sparklingwater #stillwater #icewater #hotwater #chineseculture #habit #china #france #usa #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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Since a lot of you have showed strong interest in food, I decided to make it the theme of December. All the posts this month will be related to food culture! Let’s begin with some seasonal drinks. On the top row are some of the popular hot drinks from the western countries while on the bottom row I list some of the hot drinks I would make for myself in China. All of them are believed to have medical effects that help you strengthen the body and cope with the cold weather (I’ll talk about diet treatment in another post). For example, pear soup (梨汤) moisturises lungs and relieves cough. Dates and longan soup(桂圆红枣茶)warms and nourishes qi and blood. Ginger and brown sugar soup (姜糖水)warms the stomach and expels cold. I don’t know the exact medical values of these soups, but at on psychological level they make me feel better in a cold weather. Do you have a favorite winter drink? ——————————————————— 👀 Do you know that Beijingers used to have five meals a day? Check out the second part of my Patreon post “Inside an old travel book” (link bio) www.patreon.com/tinyeyescomics/posts #food #winterdrink #spicelatte #hotchocolate #soup #mulledwine #seasonal #chineseculture #chinesefood #diettreatment #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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Chinese cuisine is often associated with words such as “rich” and “diverse”. Despite all its glamor and greatness, we all know that in many people’s mind, there’s also a dark corner of slimy, creepy stuff related to brains, insects and eyeballs. In 2011, CNN selected world’s 10 most disgusting food. On top of this winning list is Chinese “century egg”(皮蛋), which many Chinese find delicious, including myself. (I mean, who wouldn’t want some congee with minced pork and century eggs?!) The comments of the CNN reporters triggered some serious rage from its Chinese audience, with a major Chinese food company demanding CNN to apologise. I still remember the first time I saw century eggs on a dinner table. I noticed the smell and the unusual black color immediately, but as a child I was more adventurous and open to tastes, especially when my parents let me try, I knew that it must be something “safe” and “normal” to eat. I’m sure if my parents had made me insects instead of rice every meal, today I’d happily gobble down a bowl of steamed caterpillars with some fried scorpions. After all, culture is this arbitrary thing that we adopt from others. Do we really need to agree on what’s delicious or disgusting? #centuryegg #food #delicious #disgusting #chinesefood #chineseculture #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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The English word “ouch” is commonly used as an expression of one’s physical pain, (refer to the episode for usage) although in China , I would normally say “哎哟” (ai-yoh) instead. In France, the equivalent is “Aïe”. This got me curious, and while searching for other expressions, I bumped into an article from the @guardian —“Is ouch used worldwide?” Well, the answer is no, and people being interviewed in the article have shared some amusing examples from their cultures, illustrated here. (Please feel free to add other varieties or make corrections ) Even though the expressions vary from one another, one thing in common is that they all begin with a vowel, and are quite short to pronounce. I guess we all go back to our primal instinct when getting hurt. ______________________________________________________ 🎁Bonus: I also made a post about Chinese way of expressing surprise. Go to the address below or click on my link bio: 👉www.patreon.com/tinyeyescomics/posts #expression #language #linguistics #culture #funfacts #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics/posts

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During these days in Berlin, I often found myself mistakenly walking on the bike lane, which is often combined with the path for pedestrians. The separation is clearly marked out with paint but I was so used to the physically separated lanes in Beijing where I could close my eyes and walk safely (that’s not true because there are bicycles and motorcycles violating the rules). In New York, it’s common to see the bike lane lie between a parking lane and a traffic lane, or shared with vehicles. In Paris, there’s a mixture of all types of lanes (even contra-flow bike lanes where you have to go against the traffic!) and the rules are not obvious for first comers. I’m still not courageous enough to explore the city on my bike. #lanes #cityplanning #berlin #nyc #beijing #bikelife #citylife #sliceoflife #webtoon #webcomic #comics #tinyeyescomics

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#tattoo #notsocool #tinyeyescomics

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